Transmission P Codes

Transmission P Codes

For any transmission P Codes, I strongly recommend a visit to your local transmission specialist. It’s not necessary to go to the dealer but it’s absolutely imperative that you find a very reputable transmission specialist. These repairs are the most difficult to diagnose and repair for any vehicle on the road. The vast majority of repair shops out there won’t even attempt these repairs because of the level of difficulty. I also don’t recommend going to any of the national chains of transmission repair shops. My experience with these shops is that they’re less than honest most of the time, and the level of their repair service is lacking. The best bet for transmission repairs is the dealership. They have all the tools, diagnostic manuals, up to date training, and direct access to the engineers, for your specific transmission. The cost will definitely be more, when comparing one specific repair to another, but it’s definitely worth it in the long run. There’s been so many times in my career, where I’ve spoken to people that went to a national transmission repair chain, and they’ve told me they spent $1800 and the problem was still there. Then they spent another $1000 for additional parts and repairs, only to find that the condition came back a week later. When they returned to the shop, they’re given another estimate for additional parts and repairs. By the time they got to me at the dealership, they’ve spent over $3000, and they still have a malfunctioning transmission. Now I have to give them an estimate for what it’s going to take to repair their vehicle and it’s not going to be cheap. So my advice is to visit the dealership first and pay the higher price for the better service. The only time that I would recommend visiting a local transmission specialist, is if that person is highly recommended by every avenue you can find to gauge this type of thing. There are definitely some very competent transmission specialists that work for themselves, so if you’ve found one, or know one, then definitely go there for your repairs.

NOTE: Your transmission is built with a “limp” mode. This is a software program that will put the transmission into a safeguard driving mode. When this happens, you will usually only have one forward gear and reverse. Different manufacturers handle the limp mode differently. Suffice it to say that if your check engine light is on and you have one or more transmission P Codes, you will most likely have only one forward gear for most of the time you’re driving. You definitely don’t want to drive for very far like this, this will also cause the transmission to overheat. It can also cause severe internal damage to keep driving in this condition. This condition is only meant to be used to limp to the side of the road, or back home, not to drive on full time.

 




P0218- Transmission Over Temperature Condition

Think of this P Code as a warning. Your transmission is telling you that it’s overheating. Most of the time your vehicle will have a light on the dash that will illuminate saying “trans over temp” or something similar to that. That won’t always be the case though, as some vehicles have no indicator on the dash, or a trans temp gauge. Before I explain what to do with this P Code, let me give you some real quick background information. The number one enemy of your transmission is heat. Most all transmission failures are due to the fluid being overheated. For every 10 degrees fahrenheit that your transmission fluid goes up, the life of the fluid is cut in half. So if your transmission fluid temp is 30 degrees fahrenheit above normal for very long, your transmission will start to fail internally very quickly. When you see this P Code check the trans fluid first. Make sure to consult the owners manual for how to check the trans fluid, it actually matters how you check it, and what gear you check it in. If you see the fluid is low, find and repair the leak. If the fluid is full and doesn’t appear to be burnt, it’s likely that your transmission fluid temperature sensor is failing, and will need to be replaced. It’s also more likely that your transmission fluid temperature sensor is failing if this is the only P Code stored in the TCM, or Transmission Control Module. Generally if the fluid is actually overheating, there will be other P Codes as well as shifting/driving issues. If other P Codes are present, diagnose them first, as they will be the cause of this P Code. The potential causes for this P Code are not something that can be easily repaired. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:
Transmission won’t engage or has a very long delay before it engages
Transmission slips in one particular gear or in several gears
Transmission fluid leak
Possible causes:
A transmission fluid leak is the most likely cause of this P Code
A slipping clutch pack in the transmission
A slipping torque converter clutch
Transmission cooler lines or cooler is clogged
Transmission fluid temperature sensor
Other P Codes indicating a problem that will make the transmission overheat
Where to buy the parts:
It’s very unlikely that the transmission temperature sensor is available from anywhere other than the dealer. Even if it is available from the aftermarket parts dealers, I always recommend buying transmission electrical parts from the manufacturer.

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P0613- TCM Processor

This is a very simple P Code. It’s informational only and it’s telling you that there is an internal error of the TCM, or Transmission Control Module, itself. The only thing that can be done with this P Code is to replace the TCM. I strongly recommend taking your vehicle to the manufacturer for this repair. It may cost you a little more, but the quality of the part, and the dealer having easy access to the correct software to program your TCM, make this an easy choice. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

  • Transmission won’t shift, or shifts very erratically
  • In some cases the vehicle may not start in park
  • It’s somewhat likely that there won’t be any observable symptoms for this P Code

Possible causes:

  • The only possible cause for this P Code is the TCM itself

Where to buy the parts:

I strongly recommend going through the manufacturer for parts and repairs for any of your vehicle’s computer replacement repairs


P0614- ECM/TCM Incompatible

This is a purely informational P Code. It’s telling you that the ECM and the TCM aren’t communicating correctly. Most likely, if you have this P Code, one of these 2 computers has been replaced recently. If a used computer was installed on the vehicle, this is very probably the cause of this P Code. On modern vehicles, the computers can’t be changed from one vehicle to another. They’re programmed to one specific vehicle, and normally, cannot be programmed to another vehicle. If you have this P Code and neither of the 2 named computers has been replaced recently, you will need to visit your local repair shop, because one of the 2 computers has an internal error and will need to be replaced. I strongly recommend taking your vehicle to the manufacturer for this repair. It may cost you a little more, but the quality of the part, and the dealer having easy access to the correct software to program your ECM/TCM, make this an easy choice. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

  • It’s very likely your vehicle won’t start
  • There may be no observable symptoms for this P Code

Possible causes:

  • ECM or TCM just replaced with a used module
  • Whichever of the 2 modules is reporting this P Code

Where to buy the parts:

I strongly recommend going through the manufacturer for parts and repairs for any of your vehicle’s computer replacement repairs


P0700- Transmission Control System Malfunction

This is a purely informational P Code. The ECM for pretty much all vehicles on the road, is the only computer in the vehicle that is capable of turning on the check engine light. So if there is a failure in the transmission that needs to turn the check engine light on, the TCM will send this P Code to the ECM, to turn on the check engine light. That is literally all this P Code is for. There will be P Codes present in the TCM. They need to be diagnosed and repaired for this P Code to not reset. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

  • Transmission P Codes present in the TCM

Possible causes:

  • The only cause for this P Code is that there are DTC’s present in the TCM

Where to buy the parts:

There are no parts or repairs for this specific P Code. The P Code(s) in the TCM will need to be addressed


P0706- Transmission Range Sensor Circuit Range/Performance

There are other P Codes that would have the same diagnostics as this P Code, however it’s very unlikely that you will have any of these other P Codes. The purpose of the Transmission Range Sensor is to tell the TCM what position the gear shift lever is in. There is a unique electrical “signature” assigned to each position of the gear shift lever position. This information is critical to operation of the transmission, and the vehicle itself. The Transmission Range Sensor for most vehicles also contains something called a “neutral safety switch” This switch ensures that the vehicle can only be started in park or neutral, so that the vehicle doesn’t take off if started in gear. If the TCM doesn’t know the transmission is in park, the vehicle won’t start. This P Code is telling you that the TCM has had erratic electrical readings from the Transmission Range Sensor. The first thing to check is the connector for the Transmission Range Sensor. Make sure there is no damage or corrosion inside of the connector. If neither of these is noted, check the wiring in the immediate vicinity of the connector for any damage. If none is found, at this point I recommend replacing the Transmission Range Sensor. For some vehicles, this sensor is on the outside of the transmission and can be replaced pretty easily. If the range sensor happens to be inside of the transmission, I strongly recommend a visit to your local transmission specialist. Other than removing the transmission pan, if you’re not familiar with transmission repair, I don’t recommend removing any of the internal components of your transmission. There are plenty of very small parts that can come from seemingly nowhere, and not only do they have to go back in the right place, they must also be installed in the correct direction/alignment. If they’re not installed correctly, or at all, at least one of the systems of your transmission will malfunction immediately. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

    • It’s very likely the vehicle won’t start in park
    • The transmission may be in limp mode
    • The instrument cluster may have erratic readings about which gear is currently selected by the gear shift lever
    • There may be a delayed or harsh engagement into gear

Possible causes:

      • Wiring between the Transmission Range Sensor and the TCM
      • Transmission Range Sensor
      • TCM

Where to buy the parts:

The Transmission Range Sensor for some vehicles may be available from the aftermarket parts dealer, but it’s unlikely. To be positive that you have the best parts available for this repair, I recommend going through the manufacturer. I strongly recommend going through the manufacturer for parts and repairs for any of your vehicle’s computer replacement repairs


P0715- Input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit Malfunction

Your electronic automatic transmission uses an input and an output speed sensor to determine if the transmission is actually in the gear that the TCM, or Transmission Control Module, has commanded it to be in. This P Code is for the Input Speed Sensor. These speed sensors read a gear inside the transmission so the TCM will know how fast the input or output shaft is traveling. What that means to you, is that if the TCM doesn’t know how fast the input, or the output, is moving, it can’t properly calculate the correct shift pattern. Most of the time when a failure with the Input Speed Sensor is detected, the transmission will go into limp mode. The first thing to check is the connector for the Input Speed Sensor. You will need to consult a repair manual to properly locate this sensor. Once you’ve found it, check the connector for any damage or corrosion. If none is found, check the wiring in the immediate vicinity of the connector for any damage. If no issues are found with either of these, the most cost effective thing to do at this point is to replace the Input Speed Sensor. This is the cause of the P Code the vast majority of the time it appears. In some vehicles, the Input Speed Sensor will be inside of the transmission. If this is the case, then I recommend visiting your local transmission specialist. Most vehicles will have the Input Speed Sensor mounted into the transmission case and it won’t be very difficult to replace. If you’ve replaced the Input Speed Sensor and the problem still exists, it’s time to visit your local transmission specialist. The problem will most likely be in the wiring between the sensor and the TCM, but this P Code could also be a result of internal transmission failure. If internal transmission failure is the culprit, there will be additional P Codes present, to indicate the nature of the failure. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

      • Transmission is in limp mode
      • Erratic shifting
      • In some extremely rare cases, there won’t be any observable symptoms

Possible causes:

      • Input Speed Sensor
      • Slipping internal transmission component
      • Wiring from the sensor to the TCM
      • TCM. It should be noted that it’s extremely unlikely that the TCM will be the cause of this P Code

Where to buy the parts:

The Input Speed Sensor for most vehicles can be purchased from the aftermarket parts dealers. The reliability of these parts is fairly high, and can be trusted. I strongly recommend going through the manufacturer for parts and repairs for any of your vehicle’s computer replacement repairs


P0720- Output Speed Sensor Circuit Malfunction

Your electronic automatic transmission uses an input and an output speed sensor to determine if the transmission is actually in the gear that the TCM, or Transmission Control Module, has commanded it to be in. This P Code is for the Output Speed Sensor. These speed sensors read a gear inside the transmission so the TCM will know how fast the input or output shaft is traveling. What that means to you, is that if the TCM doesn’t know how fast the input, or the output, is moving, it can’t properly calculate the correct shift pattern. Most of the time when a failure with the Output Speed Sensor is detected, the transmission will go into limp mode. The Output Speed Sensor controls the speedometer display on your gauge panel. So, if there is a malfunction with the Output Speed Sensor, your speedometer will read very erratically, or not at all. On older vehicles, there is a plastic gear attached to the bottom of the Output Speed Sensor. It rides on a metallic gear inside the transmission. When you see this P Code, and you have an older vehicle that uses this type of Output Speed Sensor, remove the sensor and check the plastic gear. Since this gear rides on a metal gear, it’s pretty common for the teeth to get stripped off after time. If you find this, then simply replace the plastic gear and test drive to see if the problem still exists. If your Output Speed Sensor is completely electronic, then first check the connector for any damage or corrosion. If none is found, check the wiring in the immediate vicinity of the connector for any damage. If no issues are found with either of these, the most cost effective next step will be to replace the Output Speed Sensor. This sensor is the cause of the P Code the vast majority of the time it appears. Once you’ve replaced the sensor, if the condition still exists, it’s time to visit your local transmission specialist. The problem will most likely be in the wiring between the sensor and the TCM, but this P Code could also be a result of internal transmission failure. If internal transmission failure is the culprit, there will be additional P Codes present, to indicate the nature of the failure. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

      • Transmission is in limp mode
      • Speedometer is in op or reading very erratic
      • In some extremely rare cases, won’t be any observable symptoms

Possible causes:

      • Output Speed Sensor
      • Slipping internal transmission component
      • Wiring from the sensor to the TCM
      • TCM. It should be noted that it’s extremely unlikely that the TCM will be the cause of this P Code

Where to buy the parts:

The output speed sensor for most vehicles is readily available from the aftermarket parts dealers. The quality of these parts is perfectly reliable. I strongly recommend going through the manufacturer for parts and repairs for any of your vehicle’s computer replacement repairs

 P0729- Gear Ratio Error in 6th Gear

P0730- Incorrect Gear Ratio Error

P0731- Gear Ratio Error in 1st Gear

P0732- Gear Ratio Error in 2nd Gear

P0733- Gear Ratio Error in 3rd Gear

P0734- Gear Ratio Error in 4th Gear

P0735- Gear Ratio Error in 5th Gear

P0736- Gear Ratio Error in Reverse

The diagnostics for these 8 P Codes is the same. The only difference between these P Codes is the gear that reporting the error

These P Codes are all reporting the same error, just for a different gear. The TCM, or Transmission Control Module, uses an input and output speed sensor to determine that the transmission is in the gear the TCM has commanded. The input speed sensor measures how fast the transmission input shaft is moving and the output speed sensor does the same for the transmission output shaft. Each shaft will spin at a specified speed for every gear in your transmission is in. The TCM will report a Gear Ratio Error when one of the shafts isn’t moving at the correct speed, whether it’s too fast, or too slow. When you have gear ratio errors, it’s very likely that you will have other issues and P Codes present as well. The main cause of any of these P Codes is an internal transmission component that’s slipping. The first thing to do is check the level of the transmission fluid. Be sure to check your owners manual for the proper procedure to check the transmission fluid for your vehicle. The transmission fluid being low can cause the same symptoms as your transmission slipping. If there are other P Codes present, such as a code for a shift solenoid, or a torque converter clutch, you will need to diagnose and repair these P Codes first. They will be the cause of the Gear Ratio Errors. If no other P Codes are present, and the transmission fluid is full, it’s time for a visit to your local transmission specialist, as the cause will be an internal transmission failure. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

      • Transmission slipping in the gear that’s reporting the error
      • Other P Codes indicating a failure are present
      • Transmission in limp mode

Possible causes:

      • Low transmission fluid
      • Transmission sensor failure
      • Shift solenoid failure
      • Torque converter failure
      • Internal transmission component slipping
      • TCM. It should be noted that this is extremely unlikely to be the cause of these P Codes

Where to buy the parts:

There are no parts that are definitely associated with a gear ratio error. There are several possibilities for the cause of these P Codes. Once the cause is identified, where to buy the parts to repair these causes will have to be determined from there


P0740- Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Malfunction

The Torque Converter is the mechanical connection between the engine and the transmission. It has several jobs to perform. The first, is to turn the rotational speed of the engine into torque, or twisting force, and that translates into the force necessary to propel the vehicle. The second is to provide an additional gear ratio at highway speeds for better fuel efficiency. There is a solenoid in, or mounted on, your transmission that controls the application of the Torque Converter Clutch. If you have this P Code, there aren’t many things you can do to solve this on your own. Find the Torque Converter Solenoid and inspect the connector for any damage or corrosion. If no issues are found, check the wiring in the immediate vicinity of the solenoid. If no problems are found with either of these, it’s time to visit your local transmission specialist. The most likely cause of this P Code, is a failure of the Torque Converter Clutch itself. If it’s determined that the Torque Converter is the failed item, I STRONGLY recommend having the transmission overhauled. You can make the P Code go away by replacing the Torque Converter, but that won’t clean all of the debris out of your transmission, or repair any clutches that were damaged by the Torque Converter slipping. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

      • Transmission slipping at highway speeds
      • Transmission is in limp mode intermittently
      • Vehicle stalls as soon as the engine is started, and the transmission is put in any gear

Possible causes:

      • Torque Converter Clutch failure
      • Torque Converter solenoid
      • Wiring from the solenoid to the TCM
      • TCM. It should be noted that this is extremely unlikely to be the cause of these P Codes

Where to buy the parts:

The Torque Converter is readily from aftermarket transmission parts dealers. The quality of these parts is not only highly reliable, in many cases it it superior to the Torque Converter offered from the manufacturer. For the solenoid, the parts are available from aftermarket parts dealers, but the quality is not always reliable. Some aftermarket parts manufacturers make great transmission solenoids, and some don’t. You will need to research several places before you purchase a transmission solenoid from an aftermarket dealer. I strongly recommend going through the manufacturer for parts and repairs for any of your vehicle’s computer replacement repairs

P0750- Shift Solenoid A Malfunction

P0755- Shift Solenoid B Malfunction

P0760- Shift Solenoid C Malfunction

P0765- Shift Solenoid D Malfunction

P0770- Shift Solenoid E Malfunction

The diagnostics for these 5 P Codes are the same. The only difference between the P Codes is which solenoid is reporting the error

These P Codes all indicate an electrical failure of a Shift Solenoid. When your TCM, or Transmission Control Module, commands the transmission to shift from one gear to the next, the shift process is accomplished by opening one of the Shift Solenoids to allow transmission fluid to flow into the hydraulic control section of the transmission, for that particular gear. The main thing to understand about Shift Solenoids is, if one of them malfunctions, the gear it controls won’t operate correctly, or at all. There is very likely going to be additional P Codes present when any of these Shift Solenoid P Codes are present. The Shift Solenoids may be separate, or may be contained all in a single housing, called a Solenoid Pack. Also, the Shift Solenoids, may be contained inside the transmission, so you will need to consult a repair manual to see if the Shift Solenoids are something you have access to. If you can access the Shift Solenoids, check the connector for the Solenoid that’s reporting the error. If all of the Shift Solenoids are contained in a single Solenoid Pack, then this will apply to the connector for the Solenoid Pack. Inspect for any damage, or corrosion, to the connector. If neither of these conditions is evident, check the wiring in the immediate vicinity of the Shift Solenoid in question, for any damage. If there are no problems found with the wiring or the connectors, the most cost effective thing to do at this point, is to replace the Shift Solenoid, or Solenoid Pack, reporting the error. The Shift Solenoid is most likely the cause of these P Codes. After the Shift Solenoid has been replaced, test the transmission to see if the condition still exists. If the problem is still evident, you will need to visit your local transmission specialist at this point. The remaining causes will be the wiring between the Shift Solenoid and the TCM, or possibly, the TCM itself. If you want to contact our certified technician with any questions about your check engine light or P Codes, click here. It’s FREE!

Symptoms:

      • Transmission won’t shift into the gear the failed Shift Solenoid controls
      • Transmission in limp mode
      • Erratic shifting into the gear the failed Shift Solenoid controls

Possible causes:

      • The Shift Solenoid reporting the error
      • Wiring from the Shift Solenoid to the TCM
      • TCM

Where to buy the parts:

For a Shift Solenoid, the parts are available from aftermarket parts dealers, but the quality is not always reliable. Some aftermarket parts manufacturers make great transmission solenoids, and some don’t. You will need to research several places before you purchase a transmission solenoid from an aftermarket dealer. I strongly recommend going through the manufacturer for parts and repairs for any of your vehicle’s computer replacement repairs